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What Are Names That You Know For Groups Of Animals?

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What Are Names That You Know For Groups Of Animals?

Postby Wynthrop » Fri Nov 07, 2014 11:51 am

We know from another question that a bunch of crows is called a "murder of crows." I believe a group of gorillas is called a band. What names do you know for other animals in groups? And does anyone know why those all have different "group" names?
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What Are Names That You Know For Groups Of Animals?

Postby Nuallan » Fri Nov 07, 2014 11:56 am

A mob of kangaroos. A pod of whales. A gaggle of geese.
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What Are Names That You Know For Groups Of Animals?

Postby Anoki » Fri Nov 07, 2014 1:04 pm

Names for groups of animals Okay, I found a web site that is huge and I'm only including a partial listing because there's just too many things listed.  Kind of neat to look at it.  Please refer to the source after reading the following:   TERMS FOR GROUPS OF ANIMALS, BIRDS AND INSECTS Ever wondered what the collective noun is for various groups of animals, birds or insects? Here are some of the obvious and not so obvious. I would, however, like to point out that these terms have not been officially "authenticated".  Some more terms for other species and the more "unusual" suggestions can be found here.   ANIMAL TERM ANTELOPES A HERD of antelopes. ANTS A COLONY of ants.                    An ARMY of ants. A STATE or SWARM of ants. Courtesy of Melissa Bee - thanks. APES A SHREWDNESS of apes ASSES A HERD or PACE of asses A DROVE of asses. BABOONS A TROOP of baboons Courtesy of Michael Haberl BACTERIA A COLONY of bacteria. Micribiologists call groups of bacteria COLONIES. A culture would consist of many colonies. Ron Orts A CULTURE of bacteria.                                    Chris Moffatt BADGERS A CETE of badgers BARRACUDAS A BATTERY of barracudas. BASS A SHOAL of bass.                                 Courtesy of Melissa Bee. BATS A COLONY of bats.                               Courtesy of Melissa Bee. A CLOUD of bats. Keith Harris BEARS A SLOTH or SLEUTH of bears BEAVERS A COLONY of beavers. A FAMILY of beavers. BEES A GRIST, HIVE, SWARM, DRIFT or BIKE of bees A CLUSTER, ERST or NEST of bees. BIRDS A FLOCK, FLIGHT, or PARCEL of birds.A POD of birds(small flock)A VOLARY of birds(in an aviary)A BRACE = a pair of gamebirds or waterfowl *                                                           * Courtesy of Melissa Bee. A DISSIMULATION of birds.                           Phillip Joss BISON A HERD of bison. BITTERNS A SEDGE of bitterns.                             Courtesy of Melissa Bee. BOAR(WILD) A SOUNDER or SINGULAR of wild boar BOBOLINKS A CHAIN of bobolinks(whatever they might be!!)                                                             Courtesy of Melissa Bee. Just in case there is anyone else out there who, like me, doesn't know what a Bobolink is I have been reliably informed by Amelia B., that it is a small bird.  The male is black and white with a yellow cap on his head and the female is golden brown with brown markings. Another name for a bobolink is a whippoorwill***(their call sounds a little like someone saying the word whippoorwill). Thanks to Eric Pittenger for this additional information. ***  Apparently this is not the case. Clarice Olle has been kind enough to point out that the above is in fact incorrect. A bob-o-link(short for Robert of Lincoln) is NOT the same bird as a whippoorwill. This is confirmed on the site at http://nationalzoo.si.edu/default.cfm John Canepa as also provided the following information: Bobolinks and whippoorwills are two different birds. The bobolink is a small-medium size bird dwelling in open fields where it makes its nest on the ground and has one of the most amazing and hysterical songs ever. The whippoorwill is a medium size bird, active at night, with plumage so as that you practically step on them as they rest on the forest floor. An interesting note about the whippoorwill is that they will come to rest in a circle, with their tails all facing in so that they can be protected from danger. Susan Vanderveen also confirms - I respectively submit the information that a Bobolink and Whip-poor-will are not two terms for one bird. They are two very distinct species. BUCK BUDGERIGARS  A CHATTER of budgerigars.  BUFFALO A HERD, TROUP, GANG or OBSTINACY of buffalo BULLOCKS A DROVE of bullocks. BUTTERFLIES A SWARM or RABBLE of butterflies. A KALEIDOSCOPE of butterflies.                  Christina Gonzales A FLUTTER of butterflies.            (Priscilla Weikert sent in this one) BUZZARDS A WAKE of buzzards.                            Courtesy of Melissa Bee CAMELS A CARAVAN, FLOCK or TRAIN of camels. CARIBOU A HERD of caribou. CATERPILLARS An ARMY of caterpillars.                        Courtesy of Melissa Bee CATTLE A HERD, DROVE or DRIFT of cattle.A MOB of cattle(US and Australia*) *John Slay CATS A CLOWDER of cats.   (sent in by Paul Chapin)A POUNCE of cats.A KINDLE, LITTER OR INTRIGUE (for kittens)                                                                          Courtesy of Melissa Bee  A CLUTTER of cats. A COMFORT of cats.                       Contributed A BRACE OR CLASH of bucks.                       Michael Haberl   Sources: http://www.hintsandthings.co.uk/kennel/collectives.htm ~3critters1nheavn~ 72 months ago Please sign in to give a compliment. Please verify your account to give a compliment. Please sign in to send a message. Please verify your account to send a message.
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What Are Names That You Know For Groups Of Animals?

Postby Shoemowetochawcawe » Fri Nov 07, 2014 6:54 pm

TurboB said: 1 A mob of kangaroos. A pod of whales. A gaggle of geese. 72 months ago
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What Are Names That You Know For Groups Of Animals?

Postby kelven » Sat Nov 08, 2014 11:37 am

Terms of venery These are called terms of venery, and the best book on the subject is James Lipton's 'An Exaltation of Larks,' which I highly recommend. Some of the terms refer to animals, but some refer to people, too.   Here are some examples:   A gaggle of geese; A knot of toads; A parliament of owls; A richness of martens; A shoal of bass; A nest of rabbits A rash of dermatologists; A pound of Englishmen; A solidarity of Poles; An outback of Aussies; A quicksand of credit cards; A thrill of brides; A convulsion of belly dancers; An insanity of clauses; A leap of leopards An advance of authors A royalty of best-selling authors An engima of mystery Writrs A bosum of romance writers A blizzard of quotes A tedium of footnotes A providence of publishers   Fun stuff!   tabbycat's Recommendations An Exaltation of Larks: The Ultimate Edition Amazon List Price: $16.00 Used from: $0.90 Average Customer Rating: 5.0 out of 5(based on 15 reviews) tabbycat 72 months ago Please sign in to give a compliment. Please verify your account to give a compliment. Please sign in to send a message. Please verify your account to send a message.
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What Are Names That You Know For Groups Of Animals?

Postby Birr » Sat Nov 08, 2014 3:12 pm

My favorite is "murder of crows" because a flock of crows WILL gang up on a non-member crow and kill it. But there is "exaltation of larks," "pride of lions," "gaggle of geese," "leap of leopards," a "parliament of owls," an "ostentation of peacocks," a "smack of jellyfish,"  "slouch of models," a "shrivel of critics," an "unction of undertakers," a "blur of Impressionists," a "score of bachelors," and a "pocket of quarterbacks." Can you tell where I cut 'n' pasted?  Sources: www.powells.com/biblio/2-9780140170962-1 danielpauldavis 72 months ago Please sign in to give a compliment. Please verify your account to give a compliment. Please sign in to send a message. Please verify your account to send a message.
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What Are Names That You Know For Groups Of Animals?

Postby Artair » Sat Nov 08, 2014 6:47 pm

But there is "exaltation of larks," "pride of lions," "gaggle of geese," "leap of leopards," a "parliament of owls," an "ostentation of peacocks," a "smack of jellyfish,"  "slouch of models," a "shrivel of critics," an "unction of undertakers," a "blur of Impressionists," a "score of bachelors," and a "pocket of quarterbacks." Can you tell where I cut 'n' pasted? 
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What Are Names That You Know For Groups Of Animals?

Postby garnoc53 » Tue Nov 11, 2014 2:08 pm

Okay, I found a web site that is huge and I'm only including a partial listing because there's just too many things listed.  Kind of neat to look at it.  Please refer to the source after reading the following:   TERMS FOR GROUPS OF ANIMALS, BIRDS AND INSECTS Ever wondered what the collective noun is for various groups of animals, birds or insects? Here are some of the obvious and not so obvious. I would, however, like to point out that these terms have not been officially "authenticated".  Some more terms for other species and the more "unusual" suggestions can be found here.   ANIMAL TERM ANTELOPES A HERD of antelopes. ANTS A COLONY of ants.                    An ARMY of ants. A STATE or SWARM of ants. Courtesy of Melissa Bee - thanks. APES A SHREWDNESS of apes ASSES A HERD or PACE of asses A DROVE of asses. BABOONS A TROOP of baboons Courtesy of Michael Haberl BACTERIA A COLONY of bacteria. Micribiologists call groups of bacteria COLONIES. A culture would consist of many colonies. Ron Orts A CULTURE of bacteria.                                    Chris Moffatt BADGERS A CETE of badgers BARRACUDAS A BATTERY of barracudas. BASS A SHOAL of bass.                                 Courtesy of Melissa Bee. BATS A COLONY of bats.                               Courtesy of Melissa Bee. A CLOUD of bats. Keith Harris BEARS A SLOTH or SLEUTH of bears BEAVERS A COLONY of beavers. A FAMILY of beavers. BEES A GRIST, HIVE, SWARM, DRIFT or BIKE of bees A CLUSTER, ERST or NEST of bees. BIRDS A FLOCK, FLIGHT, or PARCEL of birds.A POD of birds(small flock)A VOLARY of birds(in an aviary)A BRACE = a pair of gamebirds or waterfowl *                                                           * Courtesy of Melissa Bee. A DISSIMULATION of birds.                           Phillip Joss BISON A HERD of bison. BITTERNS A SEDGE of bitterns.                             Courtesy of Melissa Bee. BOAR(WILD) A SOUNDER or SINGULAR of wild boar BOBOLINKS A CHAIN of bobolinks(whatever they might be!!)                                                             Courtesy of Melissa Bee. Just in case there is anyone else out there who, like me, doesn't know what a Bobolink is I have been reliably informed by Amelia B., that it is a small bird.  The male is black and white with a yellow cap on his head and the female is golden brown with brown markings. Another name for a bobolink is a whippoorwill***(their call sounds a little like someone saying the word whippoorwill). Thanks to Eric Pittenger for this additional information. ***  Apparently this is not the case. Clarice Olle has been kind enough to point out that the above is in fact incorrect. A bob-o-link(short for Robert of Lincoln) is NOT the same bird as a whippoorwill. This is confirmed on the site at http://nationalzoo.si.edu/default.cfm John Canepa as also provided the following information: Bobolinks and whippoorwills are two different birds. The bobolink is a small-medium size bird dwelling in open fields where it makes its nest on the ground and has one of the most amazing and hysterical songs ever. The whippoorwill is a medium size bird, active at night, with plumage so as that you practically step on them as they rest on the forest floor. An interesting note about the whippoorwill is that they will come to rest in a circle, with their tails all facing in so that they can be protected from danger. Susan Vanderveen also confirms - I respectively submit the information that a Bobolink and Whip-poor-will are not two terms for one bird. They are two very distinct species. BUCK BUDGERIGARS  A CHATTER of budgerigars.  BUFFALO A HERD, TROUP, GANG or OBSTINACY of buffalo BULLOCKS A DROVE of bullocks. BUTTERFLIES A SWARM or RABBLE of butterflies. A KALEIDOSCOPE of butterflies.                  Christina Gonzales A FLUTTER of butterflies.            (Priscilla Weikert sent in this one) BUZZARDS A WAKE of buzzards.                            Courtesy of Melissa Bee CAMELS A CARAVAN, FLOCK or TRAIN of camels. CARIBOU A HERD of caribou. CATERPILLARS An ARMY of caterpillars.                        Courtesy of Melissa Bee CATTLE A HERD, DROVE or DRIFT of cattle.A MOB of cattle(US and Australia*) *John Slay CATS A CLOWDER of cats.   (sent in by Paul Chapin)A POUNCE of cats.A KINDLE, LITTER OR INTRIGUE (for kittens)                                                                          Courtesy of Melissa Bee  A CLUTTER of cats. A COMFORT of cats.                       Contributed A BRACE OR CLASH of bucks.                       Michael Haberl  
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What Are Names That You Know For Groups Of Animals?

Postby Mariano » Wed Nov 12, 2014 11:21 pm

well, there's "school" for fish, "herd" for sheep/cows/etc., "flock" for seagulls??   i dunno i wish i could think of beter ones..   wolf-pack for a bunch of wolves, isn't there one for ants too..     I believe the reason for not having one uniform word to describe a pack of animals in English is because, it's ENGLISH!  the language that makes the least sense!  i know that in vietnamese for instance, there would be one word, because vietnamese as a language always makes sense, and is simple.  there's never a bunch of rules that contradict each other.. etc etc. 
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What Are Names That You Know For Groups Of Animals?

Postby Wycliff » Thu Nov 13, 2014 6:10 am

These are called terms of venery, and the best book on the subject is James Lipton's 'An Exaltation of Larks,' which I highly recommend. Some of the terms refer to animals, but some refer to people, too.   Here are some examples:   A gaggle of geese; A knot of toads; A parliament of owls; A richness of martens; A shoal of bass; A nest of rabbits A rash of dermatologists; A pound of Englishmen; A solidarity of Poles; An outback of Aussies; A quicksand of credit cards; A thrill of brides; A convulsion of belly dancers; An insanity of clauses; A leap of leopards An advance of authors A royalty of best-selling authors An engima of mystery Writrs A bosum of romance writers A blizzard of quotes A tedium of footnotes A providence of publishers   Fun stuff!
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