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I Had A Left Renal Stone Which Operated 2 Months Back.stone Analysis Reveals Calcium Oxalate.tell About My Diet.

I Had A Left Renal Stone Which Operated 2 Months Back.stone Analysis Reveals Calcium Oxalate.tell About My Diet.

Postby Farnam » Mon Oct 27, 2014 2:32 am

I had a left renal stone which operated 2 months back.Stone analysis reveals calcium oxalate.Please tell me about my restriction and diet.
Farnam
 
Posts: 10
Joined: Sun Feb 09, 2014 9:42 pm

I Had A Left Renal Stone Which Operated 2 Months Back.stone Analysis Reveals Calcium Oxalate.tell About My Diet.

Postby Laidly » Mon Oct 27, 2014 10:09 am

Dang - I found a study, but I do not have access to it - this is the subject Effect of vitamin C supplements on urinary oxalate and pH in calcium stone-forming patients:Grrrr Grr twice by the way - denied another onehttp://www.cnn.com/HEALTH/library/DS/00282.htmlCalcium stones. Roughly four out of five kidney stones are calcium stones. These stones are usually a combination of calcium and oxalate. Oxalate is a compound that occurs naturally in some fruits and vegetables. A number of factors can cause high concentrations of these substances in urine. Excess calcium, for instance, may result from ingesting large amounts of vitamin D, from treatment with thyroid hormones or certain diuretics, and from some cancers and kidney conditions. You may also have high levels of calcium if your parathyroid glands, which regulate calcium metabolism, are overactive(hyperparathyroidism). On the other hand, certain genetic factors, intestinal bypass surgery and a diet high in oxalic acid may cause excess amounts of oxalate in your bodyThese factors may increase your risk of developing kidney stones: * Lack of fluids. If you don't drink enough fluids, especially water, your urine is likely to have higher concentrations of substances that can form stones. That's also why you're more likely to form kidney stones if you live in a hot, dry climate, work in a hot environment, such as a commercial kitchen, or exercise strenuously without replacing lost fluids. * Family or personal history. If someone in your family has kidney stones, you're more likely to develop stones too. And if you've already had one or more kidney stones, you're at increased risk of developing another. * Age, sex and race. Most people who develop kidney stones are between 20 and 70 years of age. Men are more likely to develop kidney stones than are women. In addition, white Americans are at higher risk of kidney stones than are black Americans. * Certain diseases. Rare, inherited diseases such as renal tubular acidosis and cystinuria can increase your risk of kidney stones. So can more common disorders such as gout, chronic urinary tract infections and hyperparathyroidism. * Certain medications. Medications can have variable effects on stone formation. For example, diuretics may increase your risk of developing kidney stones in some situations and decrease it in others. If you're at risk, check with your doctor or pharmacist about any medications you take. * Diet. A diet that's high in protein(meat, chicken and fish) and sodium(salt), and low in whole grains and calcium may increase your risk of some types of kidney stones. * Limited activity. You're more prone to develop kidney stones if you're bedridden or very sedentary for a long period of time. That's because limited activity can cause your bones to release more calcium.Lifestyle changesFor people with a history of kidney stones, doctors usually recommend passing at least 2.5 quarts of urine a day. To do this, you'll need to drink about 3.5 quarts(14 cups) of fluids every day ? and even more if you live in a hot, dry climate. Although most liquids count, water is best.In addition, if you tend to form calcium stones ? a combination of calcium and oxalate ? your doctor may recommend restricting foods rich in oxalates. These include rhubarb, star fruit, beets, beet greens, collards, okra, refried beans, spinach, Swiss chard, sweet potatoes, sesame seeds, almonds and soy products. What's more, studies show that an overall diet low in salt and very low in animal protein can greatly reduce your chance of developing kidney stones.As a general rule, restricting your intake of calcium doesn't seem to lower your risk. In fact, researchers have found that women with the highest calcium intake are less likely to develop kidney stones than are women who consume less calcium. Why? Dietary calcium binds with oxalates in the gastrointestinal tract so that oxalates can't be absorbed from the intestine and excreted by the kidney to form stones.An exception to this rule occurs when an individual absorbs too much dietary calcium from the intestine. In such a circumstance, restricting calcium intake is useful.Calcium supplements seem to have the same protective effect as dietary calcium, but only if they're taken with meals. When taken on an empty stomach, the calcium can't bind with the oxalates in food.MedicationsMedications can control the level of acidity or alkalinity in your urine and may be helpful in people who form certain kinds of stones. The type of medication your doctor prescribes will depend on the kind of kidney stones you have: * Calcium stones. To help prevent calcium stones from forming, your doctor may prescribe a thiazide diuretic or a phosphate-containing preparation. If you have calcium stones because of a condition known as renal tubular acidosis, your doctor may suggest taking sodium bicarbonate or potassium bicarbonate. Sources: My answer - many sources awarulz 77 months ago Please sign in to give a compliment. Please verify your account to give a compliment. Please sign in to send a message. Please verify your account to send a message.
Laidly
 
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I Had A Left Renal Stone Which Operated 2 Months Back.stone Analysis Reveals Calcium Oxalate.tell About My Diet.

Postby Renny » Mon Oct 27, 2014 3:22 pm

Tomatoes. Eating a lot of tomatoes will yield calcium oxalate in your urine. The crystals can be quite clearly seen under a microscope. I imagine you'd have to eat a LOT to get a kidney stone - unless you have a kidney problem? elizabeth870 77 months ago Please sign in to give a compliment. Please verify your account to give a compliment. Please sign in to send a message. Please verify your account to send a message.
Renny
 
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I Had A Left Renal Stone Which Operated 2 Months Back.stone Analysis Reveals Calcium Oxalate.tell About My Diet.

Postby Gilmer » Mon Oct 27, 2014 10:32 pm

being celiac(can't eat dairy or gluten grains). On this diet it may prevent future stones.
Gilmer
 
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Joined: Sat Feb 15, 2014 4:16 am

I Had A Left Renal Stone Which Operated 2 Months Back.stone Analysis Reveals Calcium Oxalate.tell About My Diet.

Postby Chanoch » Tue Oct 28, 2014 8:27 am

Eating a lot of tomatoes will yield calcium oxalate in your urine. The crystals can be quite clearly seen under a microscope. I imagine you'd have to eat a LOT to get a kidney stone - unless you have a kidney problem?
Chanoch
 
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Joined: Wed Apr 02, 2014 1:44 pm

I Had A Left Renal Stone Which Operated 2 Months Back.stone Analysis Reveals Calcium Oxalate.tell About My Diet.

Postby Ewan » Tue Oct 28, 2014 1:29 pm

I have a friend who avoids oxalates since she feels better when she does. Kidney and gall stones can be from being celiac(can't eat dairy or gluten grains). On this diet it may prevent future stones. Shasha 77 months ago Please sign in to give a compliment. Please verify your account to give a compliment. Please sign in to send a message. Please verify your account to send a message.
Ewan
 
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I Had A Left Renal Stone Which Operated 2 Months Back.stone Analysis Reveals Calcium Oxalate.tell About My Diet.

Postby Faisal » Fri Nov 07, 2014 11:28 pm

Effect of vitamin C supplements on urinary oxalate and pH in calcium stone-forming patients:Grrrr Grr twice by the way - denied another onehttp://www.cnn.com/HEALTH/library/DS/00282.htmlCalcium stones. Roughly four out of five kidney stones are calcium stones. These stones are usually a combination of calcium and oxalate. Oxalate is a compound that occurs naturally in some fruits and vegetables. A number of factors can cause high concentrations of these substances in urine. Excess calcium, for instance, may result from ingesting large amounts of vitamin D, from treatment with thyroid hormones or certain diuretics, and from some cancers and kidney conditions. You may also have high levels of calcium if your parathyroid glands, which regulate calcium metabolism, are overactive(hyperparathyroidism). On the other hand, certain genetic factors, intestinal bypass surgery and a diet high in oxalic acid may cause excess amounts of oxalate in your bodyThese factors may increase your risk of developing kidney stones: * Lack of fluids. If you don't drink enough fluids, especially water, your urine is likely to have higher concentrations of substances that can form stones. That's also why you're more likely to form kidney stones if you live in a hot, dry climate, work in a hot environment, such as a commercial kitchen, or exercise strenuously without replacing lost fluids. * Family or personal history. If someone in your family has kidney stones, you're more likely to develop stones too. And if you've already had one or more kidney stones, you're at increased risk of developing another. * Age, sex and race. Most people who develop kidney stones are between 20 and 70 years of age. Men are more likely to develop kidney stones than are women. In addition, white Americans are at higher risk of kidney stones than are black Americans. * Certain diseases. Rare, inherited diseases such as renal tubular acidosis and cystinuria can increase your risk of kidney stones. So can more common disorders such as gout, chronic urinary tract infections and hyperparathyroidism. * Certain medications. Medications can have variable effects on stone formation. For example, diuretics may increase your risk of developing kidney stones in some situations and decrease it in others. If you're at risk, check with your doctor or pharmacist about any medications you take. * Diet. A diet that's high in protein(meat, chicken and fish) and sodium(salt), and low in whole grains and calcium may increase your risk of some types of kidney stones. * Limited activity. You're more prone to develop kidney stones if you're bedridden or very sedentary for a long period of time. That's because limited activity can cause your bones to release more calcium.Lifestyle changesFor people with a history of kidney stones, doctors usually recommend passing at least 2.5 quarts of urine a day. To do this, you'll need to drink about 3.5 quarts(14 cups) of fluids every day ? and even more if you live in a hot, dry climate. Although most liquids count, water is best.In addition, if you tend to form calcium stones ? a combination of calcium and oxalate ? your doctor may recommend restricting foods rich in oxalates. These include rhubarb, star fruit, beets, beet greens, collards, okra, refried beans, spinach, Swiss chard, sweet potatoes, sesame seeds, almonds and soy products. What's more, studies show that an overall diet low in salt and very low in animal protein can greatly reduce your chance of developing kidney stones.As a general rule, restricting your intake of calcium doesn't seem to lower your risk. In fact, researchers have found that women with the highest calcium intake are less likely to develop kidney stones than are women who consume less calcium. Why? Dietary calcium binds with oxalates in the gastrointestinal tract so that oxalates can't be absorbed from the intestine and excreted by the kidney to form stones.An exception to this rule occurs when an individual absorbs too much dietary calcium from the intestine. In such a circumstance, restricting calcium intake is useful.Calcium supplements seem to have the same protective effect as dietary calcium, but only if they're taken with meals. When taken on an empty stomach, the calcium can't bind with the oxalates in food.MedicationsMedications can control the level of acidity or alkalinity in your urine and may be helpful in people who form certain kinds of stones. The type of medication your doctor prescribes will depend on the kind of kidney stones you have: * Calcium stones. To help prevent calcium stones from forming, your doctor may prescribe a thiazide diuretic or a phosphate-containing preparation. If you have calcium stones because of a condition known as renal tubular acidosis, your doctor may suggest taking sodium bicarbonate or potassium bicarbonate.
Faisal
 
Posts: 10
Joined: Thu Jan 16, 2014 7:02 am


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